This website is intended for Medical Professionals only. By using this site you confirm that you are a healthcare professional.

News
Recurrent miscarriage: diabetes drug could ... An existing drug can be used to improve the womb for pregnancy, ... (08 Jan 2020)
Nerve Stimulation May Benefit Women with ... A treatment involving electrical nerve stimulation helped women ... (08 Jan 2020)
Cancer drugs could potentially treat COPD, ... New research from the University of Sheffield shows a certain ... (08 Jan 2020)
Tea drinkers live longer Drinking tea at least three times a week is linked with a longer ... (08 Jan 2020)

Carbs, Not Fats, Boost Half-Marathon Race Performance, Study Finds

Exercising Muscles Prefer Carbs over Fat for Long, High-Intensity Runs

marathonCarbohydrates are the body’s main energy source during high-intensity, prolonged running, a new study published in Journal of Applied Physiology reports.
Muscles use carbohydrate and fat stored in the body as fuel during exercise, but the fuel sources differ in availability. Carbohydrates can be used immediately but have limited stores. Fats require additional processing steps before they can be used but have larger reserves in the body. Although carbohydrates are the main energy source during high-intensity exercise, recent studies have examined strategies to improve the muscles’ ability to burn fat instead of carbohydrates during prolonged exercise, proposing that this approach will enhance performance because fat stores in the body are larger than carbohydrate stores and can supply significantly more energy.
Researchers at Australian Catholic University’s Mary Mackillop Institute for Health Research tested the importance of fuel source to endurance sports performance by blocking the body’s use of fat. Male competitive half-marathon runners ran on a treadmill until exhausted at a pace 95 percent of their best half-marathon time. They ate a calorie-free or carbohydrates meal before and during the run and took nicotinic acid to prevent the use of fat stores.
The researchers found that blocking the body’s use of fat did not affect the distance the runners covered before becoming exhausted. Blocking fat use also did not affect the use of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates contributed 83 to 91 percent of the total energy used, the research team wrote. The study shows that for high-intensity, long-duration runs, exercising muscles prefer carbohydrates as their fuel source, regardless of whether the runner has eaten or not, says Jill Leckey, primary author of the study.
“Competitive runners should focus on dietary strategies that will increase carbohydrate availability before and during competition to optimize race performance in events lasting up to 90 minutes in duration,” according to Leckey.
Although the study was conducted in competitive runners, the findings apply to recreational runners as well, says Leckey. “It’s the relative exercise intensity, for instance the percentage of an individual’s maximal oxygen uptake or maximum heart rate, that determines the proportion of carbohydrate and fat fuels used by the exercising muscles, not simply the pace they are running.”


Source Newsroom: American Physiological Society (APS)
Citations
Journal of Applied Physiology
"Altering fatty acid availability does not impair prolonged, continuous running to fatigue: Evidence for carbohydrate dependence”

Highlights

  • Give a Gift this Christmas which gives back

    The story of medicine is the story of civilization, from an ancient craft of primitive magic and religion to the sophisticated field of science and technology of today.

    Read more...
  • Nescafé 3 in1 LifeCycle HEROES return from South Asia

    Donations for Nescafé 3in1 LifeCycle Challenge 2019 can be sent via sms: 5061 7370 = €2.33; 5061 8920 = €6.99; 5061 9229 = €11.65; or via a call to 5160 2020 = €10, 5170 2005 = €15; and 5180 2006 = €25. Bank details are Swift code VALLMTMT, IBAN number MT 18 VALL 22013000000014814521017, Bank name Bank of Valletta, Account number 14814521017.

    Read more...

Join

Connect with other Medical Professionals on fb in a closed facebook group

Login

Top
We use cookies to improve our website. By continuing to use this website, you are giving consent to cookies being used. More details…