This website is intended for Medical Professionals only. By using this site you confirm that you are a healthcare professional.

News
Recurrent miscarriage: diabetes drug could ... An existing drug can be used to improve the womb for pregnancy, ... (08 Jan 2020)
Nerve Stimulation May Benefit Women with ... A treatment involving electrical nerve stimulation helped women ... (08 Jan 2020)
Cancer drugs could potentially treat COPD, ... New research from the University of Sheffield shows a certain ... (08 Jan 2020)
Tea drinkers live longer Drinking tea at least three times a week is linked with a longer ... (08 Jan 2020)

Consumption of Omega-3s Linked to Lower Risk of Fatal Heart Disease

omega3 2Blood levels of seafood and plant-based omega-3 fatty acids are moderately associated with a lower risk of dying from heart attacks, according to a new epidemiological study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, led by Liana C. Del Gobbo, Ph.D., a postdoctoral research fellow in the division of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine and senior author Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., Dr.P.H., dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston.
Researchers from around the world joined together to form the Fatty acids and Outcomes Research Consortium (FORCE). By pooling findings from diverse large studies that had measured blood or tissue levels of omega-3 fatty acids, they evaluated relationships with heart disease events over time. Each study performed new standardized, individual-level analyses. Findings were then centrally pooled in a meta-analysis.
A total of 19 studies were involved from 16 countries and including 45,637 participants. Of these, 7,973 people developed a first heart attack over time, including 2,781 deaths and 7,157 nonfatal heart attacks.
Overall, both plant-based and seafood-based omega-3s were associated with about a 10 percent lower risk of fatal heart attacks. In contrast, these fatty acids biomarkers were generally not associated with a risk of nonfatal heart attacks, suggesting a more specific mechanism for benefits of omega-3s related to death.
“These new results, including many studies which previously had not reported their findings, provide the most comprehensive picture to-date of how omega-3s may influence heart disease,” said Del Gobbo, who conducted this study as part of her postdoctoral work with Mozaffarian. “Across these diverse studies, findings were also consistent by age, sex, race, presence or absence of diabetes, and use of aspirin or cholesterol-lowering medications.”
“At a time when some but not other trials of fish oil supplementation have shown benefits, there is uncertainty about cardiovascular effects of omega-3s,” said Mozaffarian. “Our results lend support to the importance of fish and omega-3 consumption as part of a healthy diet.”
Fish is the major food source of omega-3 fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Nutrient Database, fatty fish such as salmon, trout, anchovies, sardines, and herring contain the highest amounts of omega-3 fatty acids, although all fish contain some levels. In addition to omega-3 fatty acids, fish provide specific proteins, vitamin D, selenium, and other minerals and elements. Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) is the plant-based omega-3 fatty acid found in walnuts, flaxseed oil, and canola oil and some other seed and nuts and their oils.
“Most prior studies of dietary fats have relied on self-reported estimates of intake,” said Mozaffarian. “This new global consortium provides an unprecedented opportunity to understand how blood biomarkers of many different fats and fatty acids relate to diverse health outcomes, and many additional investigations are in progress.”
This study is part of the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) Fatty acids and Outcomes Research Consortium (FORCE). There are 47 additional authors on the study.



Source Newsroom: Tufts University

Citations
JAMA Internal Medicine
Del Gobbo, L.C.; and Mozaffarian, D., et al. ?-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acid biomarkers and coronary heart disease. Pooling project of 19 cohort studies. JAMA Intern Med. 2016;176(8);1-13

Highlights

  • Nescafé 3 in1 LifeCycle HEROES return from South Asia

    Donations for Nescafé 3in1 LifeCycle Challenge 2019 can be sent via sms: 5061 7370 = €2.33; 5061 8920 = €6.99; 5061 9229 = €11.65; or via a call to 5160 2020 = €10, 5170 2005 = €15; and 5180 2006 = €25. Bank details are Swift code VALLMTMT, IBAN number MT 18 VALL 22013000000014814521017, Bank name Bank of Valletta, Account number 14814521017.

    Read more...
  • Give a Gift this Christmas which gives back

    The story of medicine is the story of civilization, from an ancient craft of primitive magic and religion to the sophisticated field of science and technology of today.

    Read more...

Join

Connect with other Medical Professionals on fb in a closed facebook group

Login

Top
We use cookies to improve our website. By continuing to use this website, you are giving consent to cookies being used. More details…