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Displaying items by tag: Nutrition

A new expert review confirms that diet significantly influences mental health and wellbeing, but cautions that the evidence for many diets is comparatively weak.

Published in Medical News
Friday, 03 January 2020 17:37

Diet has rapid effects on sperm quality

Sperm are influenced by diet, and the effects arise rapidly. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers at Linköping University, in which healthy young men were fed a diet rich in sugar.

Published in Medical News

Researchers from Queen’s University Belfast have questioned the World Health Organisation’s blanket classification of processed meat as carcinogenic after finding significant evidence gaps between processed meat treated with nitrites and nitrite-free processed meat.

Published in Medical News

What molecular event happens for prostate cancer to progress faster and to be deadlier when patients eat a high-fat diet? This is the question Dr. David P. Labbé, a scientist at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC), and his colleagues recently elucidated.

Published in Medical News

A large number of food products frequently sold on the EU market contain too much sugar, salt, fat, and not enough fibre.

Published in Medical News

People eat more with friends and family than when dining alone – a possible throwback to our early ancestors’ approach to survival, according to a new study. This phenomenon is known as ‘social facilitation’.

Previous studies found that those eating with others ate up to 48% more food than solo diners and women with obesity eating socially consumed up to 29% more than when eating alone.

Published in Medical News
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